Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from mattwjennings  23 notes
mattwjennings:

Stacey looking out over Cape Town from Table Mountain, South Africa, 2012.
We have family who own a property in Camps Bay. This was the first time being at the top of Table Mountain. We spent the day walking and taking photographs. We were very lucky in that there was no ‘blanket’ of fog over the summit. The view was stunning.

mattwjennings:

Stacey looking out over Cape Town from Table Mountain, South Africa, 2012.

We have family who own a property in Camps Bay. This was the first time being at the top of Table Mountain. We spent the day walking and taking photographs. We were very lucky in that there was no ‘blanket’ of fog over the summit. The view was stunning.

Reblogged from earthstory  63 notes
earthstory:

Sitting on a table…
 Here we see an image of a hiker seated on a ledge in Table Mountain National Park just outside of Cape Town, South Africa. This peak is known as Lion’s Head and rises to a height of nearly 700 meters. It is smaller than nearby Table Mountain, although they are composed of the same rocks. Table Mountain and Lion’s Head are composed of lightly-metamorphosed sandstones, made from sand grains deposited in a beach environment…over 450 million years ago. Those sands were buried and heated slightly; just enough for the grains to recrystallized into a solid, difficult to erode rock. The rocks have been uplifted as a consequence of the opening of the Atlantic Ocean. When South America and Africa pulled apart, it stretched the crust and allowed warmer rocks from the mantle to rise upwards. This process pushed some of the nearby rocks on the coast upwards; basically they floated on the newly arrived, warmer rocks. Today, some of those rocks are exposed in the ledge where this hiker sits. -JBB Image credit:http://trottin-the-globe.tumblr.com/post/26352140556/stranger-on-a-ledge-lions-head-south-africa (Shared throughout the internet by a variety of sources) Read more on the geology:http://www.capetown.at/heritage/history/prehistory_geo_geol_art.htm

earthstory:

Sitting on a table…


Here we see an image of a hiker seated on a ledge in Table Mountain National Park just outside of Cape Town, South Africa.

This peak is known as Lion’s Head and rises to a height of nearly 700 meters. It is smaller than nearby Table Mountain, although they are composed of the same rocks.

Table Mountain and Lion’s Head are composed of lightly-metamorphosed sandstones, made from sand grains deposited in a beach environment…over 450 million years ago.

Those sands were buried and heated slightly; just enough for the grains to recrystallized into a solid, difficult to erode rock.

The rocks have been uplifted as a consequence of the opening of the Atlantic Ocean. When South America and Africa pulled apart, it stretched the crust and allowed warmer rocks from the mantle to rise upwards. This process pushed some of the nearby rocks on the coast upwards; basically they floated on the newly arrived, warmer rocks. Today, some of those rocks are exposed in the ledge where this hiker sits.

-JBB

Image credit:
http://trottin-the-globe.tumblr.com/post/26352140556/stranger-on-a-ledge-lions-head-south-africa (Shared throughout the internet by a variety of sources)

Read more on the geology:
http://www.capetown.at/
heritage/history/prehistory_geo_geol_art.htm